Posts Tagged ‘Olympic Maths’

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WINTER OLYMPICS: How ski Jumpers Use Math to Increase their Jump Length

February 16, 2018

While air resistance has little impact on aerial skiers it is a significant factor used by ski jumpers to increase their jump distance.

The significant maths for ski jumpers is therefore X-section area.

Here is the jump at Pyeong Chang, 2018. Just imagine going down that at top speed!!!

              A ski jumper is set to jump in Pyeongchang.

                   Casey Larson USA Pyeong chang 2018

Ski jumpers increase their speed going down the ramp by reducing their X-section area:

Lindsey Van, USA, practicing in a wind tunnel

           Lindsey Van, USA, practicing in a wind tunnel

Once they leave the ramp, ski jumpers try to increase their X-section area like Ski Divers to slow their vertical fall. But they have to land safely so they keep their skis at a minimum  angle.

Abby Hughes, USA, practicing in a wind tunnel.

Abby Hughes, USA, practicing in a wind tunnel.

Abby Hughes, USA, in the air

          Abby Hughes, USA, in the air

Here are the X-section areas for Abby Hughes*:

Abby Hughes X-section

Here is the formula for Air Resistance of Drag:

D = ½CApv2

Where C is the drag coefficient or constant, which depends on the shape and spin of an object. It is found by testing the object in a wind tunnel.

A is the X-section Area,

p is the density of the air and

v the velocity of the object.

More here.

As Abby Hughes has tripled here X-section area in the air she will have tripled the vertical drag during her jump. This will slow here decent.

*Mathspig calculated the X-section area by the old fashioned method of counting squares and rounding off the final count. Mathspig sized the two pics of Abby Huges so that her head was the same size in both pictures.

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1. The Real REASON why figure skaters can spin so fast

January 23, 2014

REASON  1:

Well, mathspiggies, the girl in this video is right. Angular momentum remains constant unless external forces are applied.

L = mvr

L = angular momentum

v = linear velocity

r = separation of object

Louisa Barama, USA

Louisa Barama, USA

Let’s have a look at this equation:

Figure skate maths1

The fastest spin on ice skates was achieved by Natalia Kanounnikova (Russia) with a maximum rotational velocity of 308 RPM (rotations per minute) at Rockefeller Centre Ice Rink, New York, USA on 27 March 2006. See Guinness Book of Records.

 Record spin :  vr = 308 RPM

Other spins include:

Mao Asada, Japan, triple Axel

Mao Asada, Japan, triple Axel

Triple Axel spin vr = 220 – 280 RPM

……………………………………………………………………………………………..

 Maximum Triple Axel spin vr = 402 RPM

Skaters can spin faster during a triple axel jump because there is no friction from the ice slowing their spin.

To complete a quad axel, it’s estimated that the skater would have to rotate in the air at:

540 rpm.

…………………………………………………………………………………

Camel spin vr = 90 RPM

More info here.

Kim Yuna, South Korea

Kim Yuna, South Korea

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REASON 2:

How can a figure skater move from

a camel spin into a very fast standing spin?

Now, mathspiggies, you must separate Linear Velocity (v1 ) from Angular Velocity (vr ). Linear Velocity is measured in m/sec ie. it is the speed of, say, a skaters foot around the circle. Angular Velocity is measured in either RPM (Revolutions Per Minute) or degrees or Radians per minute. Ie. It is the rate of spin. We can’t judge how many m/sec a skaters foot is moving in a circle. We can only see how fast they spin. In other words, we see their Angular Velocity. When a skaters foot is in the Camel position that foot travels in a very big circle.

But when that same foot is in a Triple Axel postion it moves in a very, very small circle.

Patrick Chan, Canada,  Camel Spin

Patrick Chan, Canada, Camel Spin

Patrick Chan, Canada, Triple Axel

Patrick Chan, Canada, Triple Axel

figure skate maths 2

By halving the radius, firstly, a skater’s Linear Velocity doubles due to the conservation of angular momentum.

Then, secondly, by halving the radius the circumference of the circle moved by , say, the skaters foot is halved.

Overall, by doubling the velocity around the circle and halving the circumference a skater increases their rotational velocity by a factor of 4.

Look at the numbers:

Camel spin vr = 90 RPM

…………………………………………………………………………………

Triple Axel spin vr = 4 x 90 RPM = 360 RPM

That’s about right.

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3. How maths rules ski jumping

January 23, 2014

While air resistance has little impact on aerial skiers (above) it is a significant factor used by ski jumpers to increase their jump distance.

The significant maths for ski jumpers is therefore X-section area.

Here is the jump at Sochi. Just imagine going down that at top speed!!!

Sochi Ski Jump 2014 by blogger Melbourneer

Sochi Ski Jump 2014 by blogger Melbourneer

Ski jumpers increase their speed going down the ramp by reducing their X-section area:

Lindsey Van, USA, practicing in a wind tunnel

Lindsey Van, USA, practicing in a wind tunnel

Once they leave the ramp, ski jumpers try to increase their X-section area like Ski Divers to slow their vertical fall. But they have to land safely so they keep their skis at a minimum  angle.

Abby Hughes going down jump:

Abby Hughes, USA, practicing in a wind tunnel.

Abby Hughes, USA, practicing in a wind tunnel.

Abby Hughes, USA, in the air

Abby Hughes, USA, in the air

Here are the X-section areas for Abby Hughes*:

Abby Hughes X-section

Here is the formula for Air Resistance of Drag:

D = ½CApv2

Where C is the drag coefficient or constant, which depends on the shape and spin of an object. It is found by testing the object in a wind tunnel.

A is the X-section Area,

p is the density of the air and

v the velocity of the object.

More here.

As Abby Hughes has tripled here X-section area in the air she will

have tripled the vertical drag during her jump. This will slow here decent.

*Mathspig calculated the X-section area by the old fashioned method of counting squares and rounding off the final count. Mathspig sized the two pics of Abby Huges so that her head was the same size in both pictures.

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MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig …………………………………………………. with Kerry Cue

January 15, 2014

Mathspig Daily Express 2

Hellooooooooo My Little Butterflies,

Even if, like Muhammad Ali, you can move like a butterfly and sting like a bee, evidence shows that being hit in the head can cause brain damage and/or kill you. (Ban boxing – it’s demeaning and dangerous, New Scientist, 12 Aug, 2013)

Don’t get into a fight about this issue. Just do the maths. It’s a no brainer!

It’s a Knuckle Breaker KNUCKLE HEAD!

Toodles

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Mathspig

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MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig …………………………………………………. with Kerry Cue

July 25, 2013

 

 

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Helloooooo Little Mutants,

……………………………………………

This week I’m soooooooo excited about

Wolverine the movie

I just had to do lots of X-men maths.

Read on Mutants.

………………………

Cheerio

……………………. 

Porkerine

aka Mathspig

 

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MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig …………………………………………………. with Kerry Cue

July 9, 2013

Hello Sweet Peas,

This week we are busting Maths Myths. There are many Urban Myths involving maths.

Myths involving maths work because the number sounds sort of right.

eg. Drink 8 glasses of water a day.

Drink 64 fl oz or 1.89 litres of water a day  does NOT sound quite right, yet this is the same volume of water!!

Here is an Urban Myth involving maths from Mythbusters.

In 2009 (Episode 117) Grant, Tory, and Kari investigated the Myth that a giant 2m (7 ft) Lego ball rolling down a hill could smash a car.

They borrowed 1 million blocks and with all hands on deck built a 1,400 kg (3,000 pound) ball.

Did it smash the car?Nah! It fell to bits first.

Myth Busted.

pic 3 Muythbusters

But you can turn yourself into a Little Lego Character here.

There is a fabulous exercise for middle school maths with worksheets on how rumours spread @ 6 degrees of separation.

Now on with the Maths Myth Busting

Cheerio

Mathspig

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MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig MathsPig …………………………………………………. with Kerry Cue

June 25, 2013

Mathspig Goes MentalistHellooooooo Sweeties,…………………………………………..

…………………………………………………..

This week two NOW YOU SEE IT. NOW YOU DON’T tricks.

One with cards and another with your money … that is, if you like the pokies.

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Cheerio

Mathspig