Archive for the ‘Senior School’ Category

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VAMPIRES: a math horror story

March 6, 2019

You will find TWILIGHT TV series Math here.

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Math Nerd Love

February 14, 2019

The New York Times (The Perfect Valentine? A math formula 14 FEB 2019) has published an interactive widget from my favourite math website IMAGINARY for Valentine’s Day.

Here is the formula:

 

You’ll find IMAGINARY’S  interactive LOVE widget HERE.

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What do the Sydney Opera House and Freddie Mercury have in common?

November 6, 2018

Freddie Mercury is back in the news with the release of the new biopic BOHEMIAN RHAPSOSDY. ( Mathspig gives it ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐. But I’m a Freddie fan. ) So Freddie and the Opera House? What do they have in common?

NOTE: Uncanny likeness of biopic actors to the real Queen!

According to intmath The Sydney Opera House is a very unusual design based on slices out of a ball. Many differential equations (one type of integration) were solved in the design of this building.

You will never see a better parody of Queen’s ICONIC song BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY than Calculus Rhapsody By Phil Kirk & Mike Gospel (below).

And if you need to be reminded of the maths you will find links to texts here.

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I Can’t Sleep: Caffeine Math Part 3 USA UNITS

August 14, 2018

I Can’t Sleep Math: Caffeine Maths METRIC HERE.

Sensitivity to caffeine varies for individuals, but in healthy adults the half life for caffeine is approx 6hrs meaning your body eliminates half the caffeine you have drunk in 6 hrs. Ref: Caffeine Pharmacology

Caffeine interferes with sleep. One study found that consuming caffeine 6 hours before bedtime reduced total sleep time by 1 hour.

Caffeine content sources Caffeine Content Data Base

Street art by JEKS, South Carolina

The Half life equation is an exponential function.

The Mayo Clinic advises up to 400mg Caffeine a day for adults, which would be;

10 black teas

7 instant coffees

4 cappuccinos

2 dark roast brewed

less than one cup of Black Insomnia Coffee.

Approx half this amount of caffeine for 14 yos.

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Maths News: Volcano Survivor 2

May 8, 2018

Kilauea erupts in Hawaii MAY 2018.

The amazing maths of volcano eruptions.

Once lava flows are established new RIVERLETS can run on top of the original lava flow at great speed.
Puu-Oo-USGS lava riverlets

The fastest Lava flows recorded were in Hawaii in 1950 when Mauna Loa erupted. The lava traveled at 6 miles (10 kilometers) per hour through thick forest. But once the lava flows became established and good channels developed, the lava in the channels was flowing at up to 60 miles/hour (97 kph)

Can you out run a lava flow?

You are 2 km from the volcano rim and start running.

VL =   97 kph = 1.6 km per minute (k/min)

     =   60 mph

VH = 18 kph = 0.3 km/min

   = 11.2 mph (miles per hr )

GRAPH:

How long will it take for the lava to catch you?

Mauna Loa Volcano Lava Flow 1950 2

 

SIMULTANEOUS EQNS:

How long will it take for the lava to catch you?

Mathspig simultaneous Eqn 2

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Maths News: Volcano Survivor 3

May 7, 2018

Kilauea erupts in Hawaii MAY 2018.

The amazing maths of volcano eruptions.

One of the greatest dangers in a volcano eruption is not the lava flow OR being hit by a lump of flying lava or rock, but by being choked by the fast moving scorching hot pyroclastic cloud.

Mt Unzen volcano-world

In 1991 pyroclastic cloud blew out of the side of Mount Unzen in Japan. NASA has an excellent diagrams for such an event here.

According to the NASA website:

Highly mobile, these flows reach velocities of up to 400 kilometers (250 miles) per hour and can spread as far as 100 kilometers (60 miles) from the eruption point.

Can you out run a pyroclastic cloud?

Mathspig simultaneous eqn 3

Here is what happened in 1991 when the pyroclastic cloud blew out of the side of Mount Unzen in Japan.

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And the Oscar for Best Mathematical Performance Goes to …..

March 5, 2018

  ………………………………………..

And the Oscar for Best Mathematical Performance Goes to …..

Ben Zauzmer

Ben Zauzmer, a Harvard Applied Math graduate who has a 75 per cent success rate in predicting the winners of Oscar Awards every year, has correctly predicted 20 of 21 winners in 2018 Oscars, which is a success rate of 95%. 

How does he do it? He gathers thousands of data points on Oscar ceremonies over the past two decades – such as categories movies are nominated in, other award results, and aggregate critic scores – and he uses statistics to calculate how good a predictor each of those metrics is in each Oscar category. Then, he plugs in the numbers and that gives him the % chance that each film will win in each category according to  the Boston Globe.

Ben, who writes for The Hollywood Reporter, uses his mathematical model to produce  Bar Graphs like this:

This year the Best Picture was a close call, but Ben’s Mathematical Prediciton was correct.