h1

3. STUNTMAN MATHS: Motorbike Jump

August 19, 2014

Star Stuntmen

Picture 2

Star Stuntmen Monte Perin (pictured) has involved many films, including “Spider-Man,” “Star Trek, “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” and portraying Arnold Schwarzenegger’s stunt double in “Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines.”

1. perlin_stunt_ Terminator 3

Perhaps his most difficult stunt was landing his Harley in an open boxcar of a moving train for Disney’s 2008 Adam Sandler movie “Bedtime Stories”. In a career of over 25 years Perin has broken “almost everything” including both his arms, legs, knees, feet, ankles, several ribs, his back and his pelvis. See Confessions of a stuntman

Veteran stuntman Evel Knievel (1938 – 2007) was the pioneer of many stunt jumps. Here he is jumping 10 cars and 3 vans in 1973.

2 Evel Knievel JUNE-23-1973

His injuries are legendary:

3 the-many-injuries-of-evel-knievel1

More Evel Knievel

Ramp Design

4 Ramp Design Angle of final kicker

The angle of the kicker in ramp design can vary from 100 – 700 (See below)

5 Robbie Maddison's 2008 New Year's Eve jump Arc de Triomphe at the Paris Las Vegas

Picture 2

 

Moto-X Ramp Jump Maths

6 motorbike -parabola  Mr Reid

7 bike jump 1 Method 1



8 bike jump Method 1 final

 

9 bike jump method 1 final

 

Picture 2


10 bike jump method 1 final

 

As any bike nut knows increasing speed and angle of take off will increase jump distance.

Here is a graph from final gear for speed vs angle to jump 90m.

12 optimising ramp angle

 13bike jump  Method 2

METHOD 1 is approximate (See STEP 1 & STEP 2 above), but as METHOD 2 produces the same ans (See above), it is very useful.

You will find a thoroughly detailed calc for STUNT JUMP MATHS here:

And everything you ever wanted to know about PHYSICS OF STUNT JUMPS here. 

6 comments

  1. […] Stuntman Jump: The trigonometry of Motor Bike Ramps […]


  2. […] equation for projectile motion also applies to Motorbike Jumps and Longbow […]


  3. distance = v^(2) *1/g *sin(2theta), where v is in meters per second


    • Helloooo A Grundy, as in all real-world maths I’m making assumptions. Here I’m assuming the angle is too insignificant to count. ie. The serve goes straight down the centerline. This is to keep the maths simple for Middle School students. If you can do a more accurate calc I’d love to see it. Cheerio, Mathspig


  4. time is not a vector, t = 2 * V(b) * 1/g * sin(theta), seconds count. height of jump = 0.5t * V(b) * sin(theta), meters. width of jump = t * V(b) * cos(theta), meters.



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: